The New Study of Sumi-E Photography – The Art of Modern Ink Style Photography

Sumi-e photography is photography in the style of the Japanese ink brush painters – not only in the colours and textures, but in the subject matter as well. Neither filters nor digital manipulation are used. Rather, the natural light is captured from certain angles with a specific aperture and shutter speed to create an effect which is somewhere between a painting and a photo. The backgrounds emulate washi, or Japanese hand made paper, and ’empty space’ is left for calligraphy.

As the photos are printed onto an appropriate medium (water-colour paper, canvas), the calligraphy can be painted directly onto the photos – every print retains its individual character.

Similar to the masters of the traditional art form, it requires dedication, passion, concentration and above all clarity of the mind and heart to find truth and love in the new art.

The History of Sumi-e

The traditional style of ink painting in Japan has a rich and vivid history that spans over centuries. The “sumi-e” style was introduced Japan in mid-14th century by Korean missionaries. Trained in the art of concentration, clarity and simplicity, Sumi-e’s earliest practitioners were the highly disciplined monks. The masters dedicated themselves to the art form through years of reflection and strict discipline. In preparation they would make ink by grinding a solid ink stick (formed from the soot of pine branches) on stone and mixing it with water. Loading the brush (fude) they composed poems, stories, and characters in unique handwritten fonts on the delicate rice paper or silk scroll.

Prominent masters of the style are Sesshu Toyo, Tensho Shubun and Josetsu.

Secrets Behind Automotive Photography

Automotive Photography can be considered a niche in the photography industry. Hence, many are in dire need of good tips in order to produce professional level photographs.

Taking photographs of cars can be increasingly interesting. When shooting for car commercials, there are a few aspects or guidelines that need to be taken into consideration to get desired results. The secret to successful car photography is simple! Keep a few things in check!

Time of day

The time of day is of extreme importance when you want to take pictures of cars. Successful ads tend to feature cars when the sun is barely visible, preferably a few minutes after sunset or a while before sunrise. The soft golden glow bounces off every surface, giving the photograph a wholesome and glamorous vibe. The natural light also cuts down on post-processing time, making your work more authentic!

Look out for Reflections

Car photography can be tricky since hindsight can result in unwanted reflections on the car’s surface. Therefore, when you are getting ready for a photo shoot make sure you choose an open space. The shiny exterior of the automobile will mirror its surroundings, hiding its design lines. Reflections and shadows on the exterior can ruin the whole point of this product photography, if it obstructs the car’s curves and designs. This is why it is better to avoid areas with buildings and tall trees for such shoots.

And if your own reflection appears on the surface, then the best option is to use a tripod and timer.

Color and Background

Color and background need to be in perfect harmony; otherwise your picture will fail to catch the eye. Each color or paint reacts depending on the time of the day or lighting. Direct sunlight is a big no no! Most colors tend to hide their best features in direct sunlight; on the other hand, lighter colored cars can look stunning in sunlight.

According to your vehicle’s color and the theme of your photo shoot, it is vital to choose a contrasting background. The background’s sole purpose should be to highlight the car. Any objects that may serve as a distraction must be removed.

Driving Shots

The classiest car photos are the drive-by shots. Taking pictures of one moving car from another moving car is one of the coolest and most thrilling captures. Granted, it can be very dangerous!

Try shooting out of your car window while driving at 60 kilos per hour (40 m/h) with your shutter speed set at 1/100th of a second. This should capture the movement on the road and the wheels. Decreasing the shutter speed even more will create a blurry effect, which can seem nice too!

Another way of taking driving shots is to stand still and let the car drive past you. Use your lens to follow the car as it moves by, with shutter speed at 125th of a second. This method is easy and the pictures come out stunning! The effects obviously change depending on the speed of the car, so play around with it.

Night-time Shots

Contradictory to popular belief, it is possible to take good photos in the dark. For car photography, we simply need one extra instrument; a flashlight.

Firstly, you need to find a location which is Pitch Black. Street light, moonlight, billboards etc. can ruin the photo so be aware of any other sources of light. After you have reached this spot; set up your tripod, put your ISO to 100 and the shutter speed should be 30 seconds with an aperture of f/9.

Now, when the shutter is about to open you must shine your flashlight on the surface. Try to cover all sides of the car with the flashlight by walking around as the shutter opens. Experiment with the angles and sides, each photo will have a different effect!

If you do photography for the car dealership business and e-commerce website then post-processing is extremely beneficial and it is expensive and time-consuming. However, you can take the benefit of our ousourcing photo editing services to reduce your time and cost.

Royal Carlock Washington DC Hand Colored Photography

Royal Hubert Carlock (1899-1970) was born in Paris Crossing, Indiana. One of six children he was born to Benjamin and Ellen Carlock. After graduating from Indiana University, Carlock married Ethel Wohrer in 1917. He entered the U.S. Army near the end of World War I where he specialized in aerial photography as part of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and after the War had ended, the couple moved to Washington DC in 1918 where their first daughter was born.

After his discharge from the Army, Carlock secured employment with a photography firm named C.O Buckingham who at the time was producing hand-painted photographs of the chief tourist attractions in Washington, DC. This explains the obvious similarity in style between Carlock and Buckingham hand-colored pictures.

Ethel Carlock died in 1920 during an influenza epidemic, leaving Carlock a widower with a 15 month-old baby.

Carlock was fascinated by the architecture and national treasures found in our nation’s capital. He focused his photographic and hand-coloring skills on subjects found in-and-around the Washington DC area. The only photographer in his company, his black & white photographs were hand-painted in oils and sold to the multitude of tourists visiting our nation’s capital during the post World War I era.

In 1922 Carlock married his 2nd wife, Emma Clarke. In that same year he also left the employment of the Buckingham Studios and opened his own photography studio at 406 13th Street NW in Washington, DC. Carlock’s “Snappy Snap Shop” specialized in quick development of tourist’s film along with the sale of his increasingly famous hand-colored photographs of the Washington DC landmarks and monuments, including the White House, Jefferson Memorial, Lincoln Memorial, and Washington Monuments, the U.S. Capital Building, and of course, Washington’s colorful cherry blossoms. Working together as a team, Carlock took the pictures and Emma, along with other colorists, hand-tinted them.

We have seen Carlock pictures identified in three distinct manners:

• Matted pictures signed “Carlock” on the lower right corner beneath the picture, with or without a title lower left.

• Un-matted, close-framed pictures with “Carlock” being embossed on the lower-left corner of the actual picture.

• No marking on the picture or matting, but simply a “Carlock” picture label on the backing.

Jane Crandall has reported that Royal Carlock was her uncle and that both of her parents worked for him at some point. She also reported that her mother, Julia Carlock, was one of Carlock’s colorists and would bring pictures home to color in the evening. Jane Crandall also reported that many of the signatures found on Carlock pictures were actually signed by her mother.

Royal Carlock kept his business running into the 1940’s. Collector Myke Ellis has reported that the 1943 Polk Washington D.C. Address Directory listed Royal Carlock as working at 913 Pennsylvania Avenue. Even during the Depression years when so many other photographers saw their businesses either decline or closed their doors, Carlock’s business flourished due primarily to the constant high level of tourism, and the large and growing number of people who were gainfully employed by the U.S. Government.

Although his photographs usually sold best at cherry blossom time, for several years Carlock also produced a Christmas Card which contained a hand-colored photo of Washington DC. These are considered quite rare with collectors today.

As with all other early 20th c. hand-colored photographers, the advent of color film led to the decline in Carlock’s hand-colored photography business. The primary emphasis of his business turned to photo refinishing until 1957 when he retired from the photography business to devote his life to conservation.

In 1962 his 40-year marriage to Emma dissolved and in 1964 he married Grace Diane Knapp.

Suffering from cardiac problems during the final years of his life, Royal Carlock died from a heart attack in 1970. His ashes were buried on a small isle in a lagoon at the National Isaac Walton League Conservation Park near Gaithersburg, MD.

Carlock pictures are still relatively inexpensive and quite affordable. Their low price, good quality, and interesting subject matter will probably continue to make them collectible. The only limitation is that there are only approximately 10 different Washington DC scenes to collect. The next time you see a Washington DC picture in a shop or show, take a closer look at it. It will probably be a Royal Carlock hand-colored photograph.